Tag Archives: penguins

Penguins to Dame Barbara Hepworth

  • Penguins are flightless sea-birds, found mainly in the southern hemisphere and in Antarctica in particular.  They are also chocolate biscuits.  Both appear to be enjoyed by children of all ages.
  • “Boy Overboard” is a novel by Morris Gleitzman, published by Penguin Books.  It tells the tale of some children who, after many adventures are rescued by the Australian Navy.
  • In August 1930, the Royal Australian Navy submarine depot ship, HMAS Platypus was renamed HMAS Penguin.  In 1941 it was renamed HMAS Platypus again.
  • In 1936, an Australian radiographer named Frank Shackleton-Fergus, became the first man to X-ray a live duck-billed platypus.
  • In 1907, Frank Shackleton, younger brother of the famous explorer, Earnest Shackleton, was suspected of having stolen the Irish Crown Jewels.
  • The Koh-i-Noor diamond forms part of the British crown jewels.
  • The Czech arts supplies company, Koh-i-Noor manufactures chalk and oil based crayons and pastels.
  • The crayon brand name Crayola was derived from the French words craie (chalk) and oléagineux (oily).
  • Crayola crayons are made by Binney and Smith, a company originally known as the Peekskill Chemical Company.
  • In 2006, the sculptor Michael Mahalchick was a contributor to the Peekskill Project, in Peekskill, NY.
  • Sculptor Jocelyn Shipley collaborated with Michael Mahalchick in the 2002 exhibition, ‘Transmogrification’.
  • The sculptor Dame Barbara Hepworth was born Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth

I posted the above some time ago on Stevyn Colgan‘s Joined Up Thinking site over at Ning. Sadly this site no longer exists, so I thought I’d give my contribution a new airing here.

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Penguins are flightless sea-birds, found mainly in the southern hemisphere and in Antarctica in particular.  They are also chocolate biscuits.  Both appear to be enjoyed by children of all ages.

 

“Boy Overboard” is a novel by Morris Gleitzman, published by Penguin Books.  It tells the tale of some children who, after many adventures are rescued by the Australian Navy.

 

In August 1930, the Royal Australian Navy submarine depot ship, HMAS Platypus was renamed HMAS Penguin.  In 1941 it was renamed HMAS Platypus again.

 

In 1936, an Australian radiographer named Frank Shackleton-Fergus, became the first man to X-ray a live duck-billed platypus.

 

In 1907, Frank Shackleton, younger brother of the famous explorer, Earnest Shackleton, was suspected of having stolen the Irish Crown Jewels.

 

The Koh-i-Noor diamond forms part of the British crown jewels

 

The Czech arts supplies company, Koh-i-Noor, manufacture chalk and oil based crayons and pastels.

 

The crayon brand name Crayola was derived from the French words craie (chalk) and oléagineux (oily).

 

Crayola crayons are made by Binney and Smith, a company originally known as the Peekskill Chemical Company

 

In 2006, the sculptor Michael Mahalchick was a contributor to the Peekskill Project, in Peekskill, NY.

 

Sculptor Jocelyn Shipley collaborated with Michael Mahalchick in the 2002 exhibition, ‘Transmogrification’.

 

The sculptor Dame Barbara Hepworth was born Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth

Puffin Lap Dancing Club

I’m amazed at how many blog posts relate to Club Puffin, or something like that. Information abounds relating to Club Puffin cheats and even snazzy outfits for your Club Puffin alter ego. I know Club Puffin is extremely popular and hugely successful, so it’s obviously just me not getting it, but I don’t get it.

I’ve discussed this with a few kids and some not so young people who I would have thought were old enough to know better; apparently there’s a staggeringly huge population of college student Antarctic – oops, I mean North Sea –  cyber sea birds too.

I believe that Club Puffin is based on the principle that a) you’re a puffin b) you live in an igloo – silly me, I mean ‘hole in the ground’, c) you have furniture, clothes etc. and a social life. OK, I can accept that; this is the Interweb after all. As far as I know, given my pitifully minimal research of this subject, all these things are available with the free membership. The source of my confusion is that when you take up paid membership you’re entitled to more of the same, but better. So, you’re telling me that I can dress my Puffin in a virtual (i.e. not real) cheerleader outfit, but if I pay I can dress it in a better virtual (i.e. still not real) cheerleader outfit. This is like saying “I’m not going to give you a bicycle tomorrow, but if you pay me £1,000 I won’t give you a Ferrari.”

The problem for Club Puffin must be that its members stop renewing their membership and drift away as they get older. Surely there’s some way of retaining them with a more mature version. Let your puffin grow up with you, go to bars and visit other adult establishments. Perhaps it could be called ‘Penguin Lap Dancing Club’ – drat, there I go again – ‘Puffin Lap Dancing Club’.